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Why You Need to Work with a Business Immigration Lawyer in Houston

When it comes to business immigration, individuals and businesses alike must contend with many specific processes if they are seeking a green card, visa, citizenship, or another legal status. If you find yourself in this situation, you must make sure to follow these processes accurately in order to be compliant with United States law. 

 

A Houston business immigration lawyer from Fong Ilagan can make the process much more streamlined. We offer a wide range of services—including citizenship, employment-based Visas, family immigration, green cards, and more. These services are foundational to the legal system and help many families or corporations navigate the frustrating process of obtaining legal status. Keep reading to learn more!

 

Call our Houston immigration law firm to speak with one of our world-class immigration attorneys — (713) 772-2300!

What is a Business Immigration Lawyer?

Business immigration lawyers represent individuals, families, and/or businesses in front of a variety of legal departments. Some of these can include the Bureau of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), The Board of Immigration Appeals, Immigration courts, or federal circuit courts. Business immigration lawyers often help corporations and their noncitizen employees from foreign offices to the United States. 

What do Business Immigration Lawyers Do?

Work visas require sponsorship to complete work for a United State employer. There is a long list of sponsor-based employment visas for the United States, including the E-1 visa, h1-b, and O-1 visa. Each of these classifications has its own requirements for eligibility, which is where a business immigration lawyer can help. 

 

Some examples of these classifications include: 

  • EB-5: For investors that are investing one million USD in a new commercial enterprise or 500,000 if the enterprise is in a rural or economically-depressed area 
  • First Preference EB-1: Multinational executive level individuals or companies, outstanding professors and researchers, or those who are highly recognized in their field
  • E-3: Applies to nationals of Australia who are coming to the United States to perform a specialty service 
  • H2-A: Allows United States agents or employers to bring in foreign nationals to assist with agricultural roles 

What is Required for Sponsors? 

Sponsors or employers must sign the correct forms to attest to the required visa. They will have to pay fees associated with the filing and return of the employee if there is termination. They must also report any changes in employment to the USCIS. They must confirm that the individual is eligible for employment in the United States by completing an I-9 form. Depending on the category of the visa, they may also need to maintain a Public Access File. 

Common Business Immigration Concerns

With reforms and legal information constantly adapting and changing, it can be challenging for many businesses to keep up. There are also difficulties in understanding how policy works with spouses, dependents, or those who are considered self-employed. Documentation may also be a hurdle, as it can be time-consuming and extensive. 

Why Work with a Business Immigration Lawyer?

As a corporation or business, you want to make sure you do things right when it comes to the legal system. This is especially true if you are working with a highly valued employee who is willing and eager to commit. We can assist in helping your executives with getting visas or reorganizations and guide you through the process. 

Business Immigration Law Firm in Houston

At Fong Ilgan, our Houston, Texas, immigration lawyers are skilled in how businesses can most effectively get legal services. We have decades of experience that provides us with detailed knowledge of how the process works most effectively. This can save you time, money, and frustration. 

 

We have helped a variety of different industries, such as oil, gas, technology, health, research, import, and finance companies. Our core values are being honest, cost-effective, and offering insight as to what legal road would be best for your company. Contact us by calling (713) 772-2300 to get started! 

 

Differences Between Permanent Residency vs. Citizenship

The American passport is one of the most influential ones to own worldwide. U.S. Immigration statistics show that nearly 860,000 green card holders apply for U.S. citizenship.

Considering the number of people who travel to the U.S. for business or personal reasons every year, many want to apply for citizenship. Becoming a permanent resident is a dream for many visitors.

Fortunately, there’s a wide range of different legal statuses that people may have in the U.S. The most common ones include permanent residence and citizenship.

Most people think these two legal statuses are the same in regions like Huston, TX, and other areas of the United States. However, there’s a profound difference between the two that we will mention in this article.

Permanent Residency vs. Citizenship: Differences To Consider

There’s a wide range of differences between having a permanent residency and being a citizen of the United States. Here are a few things you should keep in mind.

What is a Legal Permanent Resident?

A permanent resident is a person who holds the right to stay in the United States for an indefinite period. These residents have the same rights as citizens (more or less) along with most privileges.

For example, you can work in the U.S. as a permanent resident without legal issues. Depending on your niche, you can run a personal business or work with a company.

Most permanent residents get an “alien registration card” known as a green card earlier. The card used to be green, which is why people called it such.

However, a green card is powerful enough to prove your eligibility for a job. You can apply for employment opportunities with a green card or an alien registration card.

Can Permanent Residents Travel Out Of The U.S.?

The U.S. allows residents to travel to any area outside of the United States. However, all travelers should have a valid “alien registration card” when re-entering the U.S.  

Additionally, all residents should ensure their passports do not expire before returning to the U.S. They can apply for a passport renewal in the American Embassy and have an unexpired passport for a secondary country.

Permanent residents must meet all the admission criteria back into the U.S. they met when first applying for permanent resident status. It can include certain law violations, such as health concerns, criminal records, false claims of U.S. citizenship, etc. Other severe offenses may include instances of terrorism, public charges, etc.

What Can A Permanent Resident Not Do?

There are a few things that permanent residents cannot do. One such example is the ability to vote. Individuals with permanent residency status cannot participate in the elections. Additionally, people with U.S. legal citizenship can vote in the presidential elections.

Is Permanent Residency Valid Forever?

The permanent residency makes the immigrants legal in the United States as long as they do not commit serious crimes or other legislative violations. People who violate these rules can be deported and banned from the U.S. permanently and may lose their residency status.

Additionally, some traveling scenarios may have the same result for the immigrants. For example, some people may lose their permanent residency status because of staying out of the U.S. for more than their designated period. The allotted period is six months at a time.  

The immigration department authorities will assess your situation and determine your status. There are two scenarios in this case:

  • The permanent resident has abandoned their permanent residency in the United States.
  • The individual cannot return to the U.S. on time for personal reasons.

Additionally, individuals who remain out of the U.S. for a year or more no longer hold a permanent residency. They need to re-apply for permanent residence and meet the requirements again.

However, a legal attorney can present your case to the American Embassy and defend it against the immigration authorities.

What Responsibility Does a Permanent Resident Have?

A person with a permanent residence has some responsibilities they will need to uphold. 

These include:

  • Filing the U.S. tax returns as a permanent resident in the U.S.
  • Abide by all the laws and regulations the government sets in their state.
  • Sign up for the Selective Service (applicable for males and females between the ages of 18 and 25)
  • Support the government by all means.
  • Notify the USCIS about any changes in residential address.

Get Information with the Best,  Contact Fong Ilagan

There’s a profound difference between a citizen and a permanent resident in the U.S. Understanding your rights and responsibilities depend on your immigration status in the U.S. Individuals facing immigration problems should reach out to a professional law firm.

Our immigration lawyers at Fong Ilagan are more than happy to help people looking to apply for permanent residence or defend their case against embassy authorities. We have an expert team who will assess and resolve your situation to protect your U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status.

Reach out to us today!

 

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